About your Search

20130126
20130203
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
with dental care, mental health, and other healthcare issues, the groups that need healthcare the most are the least likely to receive it. the good news is 11 months from now we will be providing health insurance to dirty million more americans are the affordable care act. -- dirty million more americans are the affordable care act. we do not know how we will provide primary health care to those americans who will now have health insurance. let me rattle off some statistics that should be of concern to the congress and to all americans. not widely known, approximately 45,000 people every single year die in the united states of america because they do not have health insurance and they do not get to a dr. in time. 45,000 americans. according to the health resources and service administration, we need 16,000 primary care practitioners to meet the need that exists today with a ratio of one provider to 2000 patients. over 52,000 our merry care physicians will be needed by 2025 -- primary care physicians will be needed by 2025. over half of patient visits are for primary care. only 7% of th
own purdum much. we need to build a health-care system that is about -- today, it is all about aging and affluence and diabetes and health care. for the future, it must connect to the internet. mobile internet is the most important technology on the planet. and it has to serve the largest group of health-care workers in the world. and that is not doctors and nurses. they are outnumbered 10 to one by informal family caregivers. that is, you and the caring for kids, our parents, our brothers and sisters. that is a group that has to address, consumers. and number three, number one engagement transaction for consumers that they do every day, that they think and they believe and they know will keep them well is to swallow their daily pill. if you think about these massive transitions that have occurred in financial services, retail, commerce, the key is to find a transaction that consumers already engaged in that that is something they want or need to do. just like in financial services, they digitize banking by having people pay their bills and trade their stocks on line. we have digitiz
not know if the health-care cost dragon has been slain or is just hibernating. how much of the slow increase comes from the sluggish economic recovery where people without insurance postpone care over which they don't have any kind of discretion at all, and what about the chronic conditions that continued the development of more sophisticated and expensive treatments and tasks? and for the most expensive health care program there is the fact that 10,000 baby boomers are joining me in the over 65 club every day. despite the encouraging numbers about 2011 there is still a lot about this issue to be discussed and analyzed. and here we are with what i think is going to be a very good program on that topic. we are fairly pleased to have, as our partner in today's program, the commonwealth fund. and we are especially pleased to have as our co-moderator today, dr. david blumenthal. i will mention that his policy an analyst -- on top of his policy and analytical expertise he is a care -- welcome to your first online briefing as the head of commonwealth. we are pleased to have you here. >> i
it is for 13,000 pages. this will restrict our ability in life-saving medical devices. that is just healthcare. now the president is implementing his agenda. we will see that the benefits are far less than advertised. the costs of this agenda are huge. we spend when chilean dollars more than we take in each year. we spend $1 trillion more than we taken each year. we cannot keep that up. that is a moment where our economy stalls. we will have to convince the country to change course. we had to reform entitlements. we had to revisit the healthcare law. clearly president obama does not want us to get that chance. he want his last two years to look just like his first two years of his presidency. it was to perpetuate progressive government for at least a generation. why? he thinks it is the right and to do. to do that, he needs to delegitimize the republican party and house republicans, in particular. he will try to divide us. he will try to get us to fight with each other, question each other so we do not challenge him. if we play into his hands, we will betray the voters who supported us in the
of healthcare, number one in businesses owned by women, number one and medium income, and we are not done yet. [applause] as we emerge, as we emerge and we still have a long way to go, but as we emerge from the toughest economic times, the state of our state is strong and we are growing stronger still. [applause] none of this, none of this happened by chance. many of you have passed tough votes to make it happen. remember seven years ago? we started following the same math approach that created our federal deficits at the national level. democrats and republicans alike in this very chamber had voted to cut taxes for millionaires and to increase state spending without paying for either one. the result? $1.7 billion dollar deficit. that is how it works. it is failing to deliver results. underperforming schools, tuition hikes, rising in crime outside of baltimore. in 2007, together we started making that her choices. we cut spending growth, we had a penny to the sales tax to improve our children's education. we made our tax code more progressive and fair. we put concrete acts and to close our. w
sustainable and profitable growth will come from the b2b-- avionics, healthcare. we are just scratching the surface in terms of technology application. we'll panasonic w manufacturing televisions? -- >> will panasonic still be manufacturing televisions? >> i think displays will still have the prominent place in home in communicating content and information. >> joe taylor, chairman and president of panasonic north america. this is "the communicators." "the communicators" is on --ation at ces last vegas 201 lsaas vegas 2013. more next week. >> on "newsmakers" senator chuck grassley talks about guns and immigration reform and other topics. sunday at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. eastern here on c-span. now a panel of policy-makers examines how congress and l
, issues of healthcare. proverbs notes this, without a vision, the people perish. they do not literally perish. they just bicker and fight and become so polarized they cannot get anything done. we are in need of a new common, national vision. not once only democratic or solely republican. we need at least one goal where we can come together. that is where we need to go. god has given you a unique gift, mr. president. you have the ability to cast vision and inspire people. you should have been a preacher. [laughter] [applause] god actually has you exactly where god wants you. yesterday you begin to lay out a vision for us in your inaugural address was very powerful and compelling. somewhere we have got to find and forge one or two that dreams or visions that people on the right and they left, republicans and democrats, can come together and back hands on this. you hinted towards that yesterday. we have to remember our picture of the promised land. when we do that, anything is possible in america. i offer one small example of the power of vision from the church i serve in kansas city. one
would expect the government actuaries to be lowering their forecast for government healthcare costs. they haven't. if you look at both the government actuaries are now saying will happen about federal health care's ending, the problem is -- healthcare spending the problem is worse. you do not have to fix social security, the affordable care act will fix our spending problem. we fixed that areas they are now saying we haven't done it. so we have to do some unspecified health care reform. that is a problem. >> no one ever said we've never had to do anything about social security area where the description has always done is that the problems in social security are more manageable. it has a deficit if you look over the next 75 years. reasonably sensible changes that we could understand could dilip that area there is a lot -- you deal with that. people say we should deal with that. the affordable care act was never supposed to solve all of our entitlement programs. it was all a mixture of, we do have a problem that 40 million americans that don't have health insurance or access to healt
getting timely, mental health care should have another option -- access to the thousands of healthcare providers that care for military families. the proposal borrows from the playbook of republican mitt romney who raised the idea during the presidential campaign. congressman miller said the proposal would double overnight the number of psychiatrists available to veterans who need mental health treatment. senate majority leader harry reid said he anticipates a full senate vote on the confirmation of john kerry to be the next secretary of state. the foreign relations committee is set to confirm the nomination and send it on to the full senate. large senate coverage to get that 10:00 a.m. eastern time on c-span -- coverage begins at 10:00 a.m. eastern time on c- span2. >> one cannot count the times that american say we are the best country in the world. what a marvelously stupid thing to say. of all the countries in the world, everybody think they are pretty good. why do we have to believe we are the best? what does that mean why do we have -- mean, and why do we have to assert it all of
transforming the way we deliver healthcare, so we can create jobs and take care of those who need our help the most. to have a healthy economy, we need healthy citizens. for those of us with health insurance, we're paying too much and getting too little. and for the tens of thousands of montanans who don't have insurance, the emergency room has become a primary care facility, pushing costs for all of us even higher. the fact is, subsidizing expensive er care for the uninsured costs montanans $300 million a year. that makes no sense when there is a smarter, cheaper way to provide better care. through access health montana, we are proposing a made-in- montana solution designed to increase coverage and access to health care for more montana families. it will also create a patient- centered delivery system that focuses on coordinating care and improving health, rather than simply treating illness. implementing these measures will allow us to better control and ultimately lower the costs of health care -- slowing the annual rate hikes that hit all of our wallets. this is an opportunity to reduc
in 1965, the typical american lived to about 70. today they live until about 78. health-care costs were roughly one-third as a measure of gdp as they are now. >> i am so glad we have so much bipartisan agreement. we can take steps to lower health-care costs. it is true, medicare is a growing part of the federal budget. it is also part -- also true that if we had the same -- it will take $500 billion over the next several decades. it endorsed the amount of money -- dwarfs the amount of money. i believe in raising the retirement age because we believe you should retire when you are older. we also believe people are entitled to health care. when you raise medicare, you are actually increasing the cost on business. >> let's just ask the audience, for the sake of argument, let's see where people come in on this medicare issue. some suggest this as one way to go, as a realistic response to the changing demographics, living longer. the question up on your screen, how likely would be to support a big deal at that would include raising the eligibility for medicare? while they are voting -- >> yo
for healthcare, rising prices for insurance, people losing their coverage, which they are in droves now. companies putting people on part-time work so they do not have to provide them with insurance. all kinds of effects are happening. all those realities accumulate, and as obama pushes the envelope beyond where the american people are comfortable , we could actually have the fulfillment of him going too far and then getting lost opportunities. >> you are nodding. do you think it went too far? >> overreached -- bill clinton in 1994. republicans thought that in 2000 x where the new governor of indiana said, hey, republicans are going to act like democrats with all that spending and government expansion, they will just hire the professionals. and they did. then you saw in 2010, dialing back of the extremism of the first two years. yes, i would like to back up to your original question. i stand in a very small circle of conservatives who have said publicly that obama has significant advantages and would probably win. a recent i said that, i am a professional pollster. i saw a couple things
what are people concerned about that health-care costs. to a lesser extents one economic growth is stronger, maybe they're worried about issues related to the environment. these are not issues that republicans like to talk about. they're not issues that are good at talking about. this is where it emerged in the late 1990's from a time when bill clinton had been something republicans up and down washington. the whole point of bush was to craft a republican party that had something to say about education. something like the prescription drug bill was too big and should have been paid for. the republican party will never give back to the wilderness. we have to keep our brand pure and make sure americans and no where the party of small government. americans are confident that the republican party is the party's small government. they did not vote for the republican party. it is possible that he should not nominate mitt romney next time and get a true conservative, if you look at opinion polls, barack obama won the election because people thought he cared about people like us. that i
to be a problem. host: one of our callers earlier talked about the federal health-care law and how realistic is dealing with it -- how real estate is dealing with it. can you still hear me? we can still hear you, can you hear us? i think we are having some phone issues. we will see if we can straighten that out. in the meantime we will go to a few more calls. let us go to holbrook, massachusetts on the democrats' line. caller: and i am greatly pleased with the job the governor is doing. the only thing that comes to mind is the vacant senate seat. patrick should nominate martha kolbe who is currently a -- currently an attorney general in that state. host: we will go to diane. would you think is going on in south dakota? caller: there is a lot going on here. i have lived here since 1979. the economy here has changed since then. we are in a mild recession. one thing going on here in hot springs where i live is, and they are planning to close our va hospital here. that is a big issue for not only south dakota but wyoming, nebraska, north dakota. people come from all over montana to go to our va.
of all. that speeds up the cost of those programs. also, we have seen health-care costs rise pretty fast in the past. if nothing is done about that, that becomes a problem. if you look at the budget and took to a straight line projection of the cost of the programs and a straight line projection of revenue, something will have to give. some combination of revenue increases and money-saving measures, whether that is ways to squeeze down the cost of health care, possibly cuts in benefits. the question rarely asked is why we have to make that decision about how we're going to do that right now? if your theory is in the year 2030 -- at some future date we will have to cut benefits, why is committing to cut in future benefits the solution to the problem? it is predetermining how we're going to do it. it has nothing to do with fiscal responsibility. this is a very strange -- people have taken the reality of possible problems a decade from now and turn that into a case of urgent action now, which is not. -- which it is not. the one is talking about bolstering the programs. you can always cut be
the spending in 2013 and 2014. guest: it is hard to -- healthcare is an odd category. for most workers, it is paid for by your employer. you see a small share of the cost. others pay it out-of-pocket. for others, it is a government benefit. it shows up as government transfer payments. seeing how the affordable care act will work and affect these things, there is a lot we do not know. it was passed more than two years ago. we are just seeing how it will work and affect a lot of things in the economy. host: is this in your purview? guest: we only have data through 2012. it has been relatively little impact so far. we expect the numbers to show up more as we go into 2014. host: derek, minnesota, doing the same. caller: do you work for the government? are you independent? guest: i work for the government at the bureau of economic analysis as part of the department of congress. we put up economic statistics as our main business. caller: do you have relatives in there? host: your question? caller: what we are talking about today is how americans are doing financially. i look at it from 50-ye
- quality healthcare. i will work with those interests in mind just as you do every day and administration. i accept this temporary post confident in the knowledge and perspective i have acquired working closely with you and the lieutenant governor. you the commonwealth should be assured that i will go to that nation capital ever mindful of what is important to the people of massachusetts. also, congratulations on john kerry to his confirmation and they can for his years of commitment and service to the people of massachusetts. -- thank him for his years of commitment and service to the people of massachusetts. i aim to continue that work in the next coming months. because the work is closely aligned with the work governor patrick has been focused on, i worked at the highest level of the administration. as chief legal counsel and chief of staff. in those roles, i have been privileged every day to hear from individuals, advocacy groups so i can better understand and act upon the opportunities and challenges facing our state. i'm confident in my ability to make a positive impact while in the
employees international union. they represent over 2 million workers and healthcare and property services. brandon leads the organization's lyrical program -- political program. prior to coming to sei you, he worked extensively on campaigns for victory. welcome, brandon. to his right, we have glenn caroline joining us from the national rifle association. in this capacity, he will implement their grassroots program as well as the association field operations, voter operations, and we're looking at all those levels. mr. caroline is responsible for the volunteer corps daters -- volunteer coordinators. glenn caroline has hired and train representatives, coordinating on the ground grassroots campaign across the country. welcome, glenn. we're going to follow follow the same format that we did before -- each panelist will have eight minutes to lay out for our discussion. then we will go to aq&a. >>;-) so much. -- thank you so much. in addition to serving, i am m.the league of conservation voters -- how do we do that? since 1970, we've been advocating for environmental policies and electing proen
, the economy, healthcare, reducing the deficit, or addressing climate change. he is respected by leaders of the government, and if you add it all up, i think he is spent most of the last four years leading interagency meetings, hearing people out, listening to them, forging consensus, and making sure policies are implemented and everybody is held accountable. he always holds himself accountable first and foremost. it is no easy task, but through it all denis mcdonough does it with class, integrity and thoughtfulness for other people's point of views. he is the consummate public servant, he plays it straight and that is the kind of teamwork that i want in the white house. time and again i have relied on dennis to help in the outreach to our immigrant and faith communities. he understands that in the end our policies and programs are measured in the concrete differences that they make in the lives of fellow human beings and the values that we advance as americans. he insists on knowing for himself the real world impact of the decisions that we make, so away from the cameras without fanfare
tomorrow morning. a senate health subcommittee will hear from healthcare professionals about the primary dr. shortage. that is here on c-span at 10 o'clock a.m. eastern. also at 10:00 a.m., on c-span3, the american enterprise institute examines how the film "zero dark thirty" petraeus enhanced interrogation by the cia. >> one cannot count the times that americans say that we're the best country in the world. what a marvelously stupid thing to say. of all the countries in the world? everybody thinks their country is pretty good. why do we have to believe that we are the best? what does that mean? why do we have to assert it? what does it mean to other people who consume it? american products go around the world, information products, go around the world, so you are observed by people in every corner of the world. we teach them not to like us. gratuitously. >> author, activist, and trans africa founder randall robinson. three hours live on booktv on c- span2. >> a bipartisan group of senators is proposing changes to immigration laws, which would include a pathway to citizenship for the 11 mil
the ratio is quite as large. >> the have lower health-care costs and as good outcomes, if not better. >> about half. >> in health care costs. i just want to do this. senator murphy again brought this up. accountable care organizations, which we have a lot of in our state, he and health care homes -- medical homes -- would elevate the role of a general practitioner in that model, in the sense that they would be sort of organizing this team that does the care? does anybody have an opinion on that? >> specifically, unless a fee- for-service payment mechanism is a change -- there is a proposal to do that in these new medical home models, to move to a capitated system. there is a chance that would move the needle. i would caution -- i know this research fairly well. there is limited evidence that patient-centered medical homes are going to reduce costs. i think that intervention, while worthy, and we are working on it at the state level and with the va, is still, in my view, the experimental period -- is still experimental. >> thank you. one last thing. i really thought it was really off
to keep pregnancy going. that is an individual responsibility. furthermore, the problem with healthcare -- they are telling me, your insurance does not have to pay that, but if somebody wants a different insurance policy, then the insurer has to pay for that. what is the difference? there is no difference. thank you. host: our next call, rafah in michigan. you're on the "washington journal." caller: i was wondering why it was that seized and played the clip on the right-to-life movement last week, but they called it the anti-abortion movement. the question i really have is if koreshan is a natural -- abortion is natural and acceptable, why is it never shown on tv? they have so many operations that they have. if it is so natural and people find it acceptable, why do not ever see it on tv? is there a problem with it? how old does a child have to be before it can be killed? do we do it like a duke in netherlands, up to two years old? host: we will leave it right there. we want to show you some of the white house briefing on friday where press secretary jay carney talked to the media about
are much greater than we originally thought and we will reverberate through the health-care system is four years to come. finally, i would like to tell the committee about a program called mental health first-aid. it we believe in educating communities about mental health. you may know mental health disorders often began manifesting as early as 14 years of age. according to the american psychiatric organization, the first obvious signs occur between 18-24. on average, it takes eight years of the treatment. from the time treatment begins, the cost of medicare -- mental health care services are higher and effectiveness is reduced. that is why we are excited about mental health first aid, early intervention and early detection and implemented run the enough to help millions of our citizens in psychiatric distress. this to be similar to first-aid training by the red cross. this is key to the public health approach. mental health first-aid training has been offered to police officers and other first responders from rhode island, denver, dormitory staff in colleges across the country and local y
is the most efficient deliver of medicare in the health-care system. if we get this right, 40% of the savings will come back to the federal budget, but the rest will go to kaiser, blue cross, united. businesses and families all across the country. we of a real fight in our hands to steer this in the right direction. i hope are hearing helps to help us make the right choice. >> the broader hearing was the health care physicians and the united states. we'll show you that tonight. in about 40 minutes, on the floor of the u.s. senate, look for the senate vote on senator john kerry to be the next secretary of state. we expect that at 4:15 eastern. earlier today, a discussion on fact vs. fiction and what israel about the latest film of "zero dark thirty." among those participating, general michael hayden. >> good morning. welcome to aei and this morning's panel, separating fact from fiction. i am a fellow at the american enterprise institute and member of the task force on detention and interrogation policy. kathryn piccolos recent film depicting the operation that killed osama bin laden sparked co
to improving physical health care by simultaneously lowering overall health-care costs. our expertise is part of the solution to meet the travel and of health care. reduce costs, improve health and quality outcomes. we're grateful that it launched primary-care and behavioral health integrated care programs. and since has launched 94 programs across the country. to have happened to land at center stone. and reducing the total health care costs by making sure services for behavioral health and physical health are provided at the same location. we have a substantial and complex task before us. we cannot solve these issues alone as providers. this is a watershed moment that the man's courage and action. everyone in this room shares responsibility for the future of community and a mental health. health centers stand ready to work with you. elected representatives and officials to make a difference in the u.s. mental health care system. >> please proceed. >> thank you for always being there for us for mental health. it is interesting. as i hear the discussions happening around the room. i think you
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)